What is the Nexus Category field when registering .US domains?

Registrants of .US domain names must be either:

  • A natural person (i) who is a United States citizen, (ii) who is a permanent resident of the United States of America or any of its possessions or territories, or (iii) whose primary place of domicile is in the United States of America or any of its possessions.
  • A United States entity or organization that is (i) incorporated within one of the fifty (50) U.S. states, the District of Columbia, or any of the United States possessions or territories, or (ii) organized or otherwise constituted under the laws of a state of the United States of America, the District of Columbia or any of its possessions or territories (including a federal, state, or local government of the United States or a political subdivision thereof, and non-commercial organizations based in the United States).
  • A foreign entity or organization that has a bona fide presence in the United States of America or any of its possessions or territories.

The Central Registry for .US domains requires this info to satisfy the .US Nexus requirement. For more information, please visit the .US TLD Nexus Requirements page.

Nexus Categories C11,C12,C21,C31 and C32

The US Nexus requirement specify that all registrants must fall into one of the following categories to register in the usTLD:

1) A natural person

a) who is a United States Citizen (category C11),or

b) who is a permanent resident of the United States of America or any of its possessions or territories (category C12).

2) A U.S. organization incorporated within one of the fifty (50) U.S. states, the District of Columbia, or any of the United States possessions or territories or organized or otherwise constituted under the laws of the United States of America, the District of Columbia or any of its possessions or territories or a U.S. federal, state, or local government entity or political subdivision thereof (category C21).

3) An entity of organization that has a bona fide presence in the United States of America or any of its possessions or territories that

a) Regularly engages in lawful activities (sales of goods or services or other business, commercial or non-commercial, including not-for-profit relations in the United States) (category C31), or

b) has an office or other facility in the U.S. (category C32).

To register a name, registrants, through their registrars will be required to provide basic registration information to the Registry.

The minimum required information is:

* The domain name registered;
* The IP address and corresponding names of the primary and secondary name servers for the registered name;
* The registrar name and URL or, where appropriate, the identity of the delegated manager under which the name is registered;
* The original creation date and term of the registration;
* The name and postal address of the domain name registrant;
* The name, postal address, e-mail address, voice telephone number, and (where available) fax number of the name holder for the name registered;
* The name, postal address, e-mail address, voice telephone number, and (where available) fax number of the technical contact for the name registered; and
* The name, postal address, e-mail address, voice telephone number, and (where available) fax number of the administrative contact for the name registered.

In addition to the above information, registrants will be required to provide certain additional Nexus Information to their registrar. Except where it is noted below that a registration will be denied if information is missing, failure of a registration to satisfy Nexus will result in the name being placed upon a 30-day hold during which time the registrar will be notified and given the opportunity to correct the information with the registrant. If no action is taken by the registrar within the 30-day period, the registration will be cancelled and the name will be returned to available status. The registration fee will not be refunded. If, on the other hand, the registrar is able to demonstrate compliance with the requirement and the information is corrected, the hold will be released and the name will be registered.
* Certification that Registrant satisfies nexus requirement — if not completed, then registration will be rejected;
* Basis for compliance (Nexus Category 1, 2, or 3) — if not completed, then registration will be rejected;
* Certification that the listed name servers are located within the United States – if not completed, then registration will be rejected;

Series about Being Self Employed

I thought today that I would start a series of articles on the subject of being self-employed. I’ve ‘done my own thing’ for ten years since I was 21 and that’s a lot of experience behind me. I’ve had a few full-time jobs off and on in that timeline for various reasons but ultimately I’ve always come back to being a self-employed web developer.

This post will index the content as it appears on this site:

 

CSS for making a welcome box in the middle of your screen,

This makes a ‘welcome’ box app equal to half the size of the viewport, and directly in the center of the screen. Useful in some cases.

.welcome_box {
    position:absolute;
    height:50%;
    width:50%;
    left:25%;
    top:25%;
    background-color:black;
    display:block;
    border-radius:20px;
    opacity: 0.5;
}

CSS for making a fullscreen 2×2 grid

This divides the screen into four equal areas, stretching the whole area of the screen. Useful in some instances.

/* 2x2 Grid Styling */

.kx_grid_2x2 > div {
    position:absolute; padding:0px; margin:0px; height:50%; width:50%;
}

.kx_grid_2x2 > div.kx_grid_top_left        { left:0%;  top:0%; }
.kx_grid_2x2 > div.kx_grid_top_right       { left:50%; top:0%; }
.kx_grid_2x2 > div.kx_grid_bottom_left     { left:0%;  top:50%; }
.kx_grid_2x2 > div.kx_grid_bottom_right    { left:50%; top:50%; }

/* End 2x2 Grid Styling */

Use it like:

<div class = "kx_grid_2x2">
<div class="kx_grid_top_left">TOP LEFT</div>
<div class="kx_grid_top_right">TOP RIGHT</div>
<div class="kx_grid_bottom_left">BOTTOM LEFT</div>
<div class="kx_grid_bottom_right">BOTTOM RIGHT</div>
</div><!-- end grid_2x2 -->

How to get CSS properties of a clicked element

Came across some old code that could be useful in the future. Basically if you use this, if you click on a div it will cycle through the CSS properties (that you’ve asked for) and tell you what the value is. In this instance, it tells you the width, height and background-color.

$( "div" ).click(function() {
        
var arr_css_properties = ["id", "width", "height", "color", "background-color", "top", "left"];
        
$(this).addClass('bg_green');
    
var html = [ "The clicked div has the following styles:" ];
    
var styleProps = $( this ).css(arr_css_properties);
        
$.each( styleProps, function( prop, value ) {
            
html.push( prop + ": " + value );
            
});
        
$( "#result" ).html( html.join( "<br>" ) );
        
alert( html.join( "<br>" )  );

});

Macbook Pro 2014 15″ Review – Initial Thoughts

Bought the new Macbook Pro 15″ today from John Lewis. On the outside it looks exactly the same as all the previous incarnations, so nothing really to report there. Interestingly, despite Apple’s dominance of touch iPhone and iPads, there is no touchscreen on the Macbook Pro.

A Lenovo sales assistant showed me the Lenovo Yoga 2 laptop on Windows 8, which actually seemed pretty decent. Once you learn the touch gestures, navigating around the Windows operating system seemed pretty fluid. People don’t really give the new touchscreen laptops a chance, but they clearly are the future and it will only be a matter of time before the MBP includes this sort of functionality. However, functionality wise, a non touch-screen MBP doesn’t really hinder me when I consider the work that I normally do. Interestingly though, the Lenovo Yoga 2 laptop allows the monitor to be completely pushed back so it is back-to-back with the main PC unit, giving a tablet experience. All in all, the Yoga 2 laptop seemed pretty decent but I wasn’t convinced it would give me the raw computing power that the MBP would.

Back to the MBP, I have come from a 13″ 2008 version, and crunch time was approaching where I needed to travel AND do some proper work. The 13″ versions of the new MBPs are great, and if you are going for portability I would just recommend to make a special order and go with the entry level one but with 16 gigs of RAM. However, I’m finding myself doing a lot of graphic work, and coding work – and the 13″ monitor simply isn’t big enough and isn’t a comfortable working experience! Equally the old 2008 MBP I had, had a really low resolution which meant that any sort of website editing felt really cramped and restricted my creativity and productivity. That and it only had 2 gigs of RAM!

The only thing I’ve noticed so far with this new 15″ is that the keys feel slightly different. They are the same height and width but don’t have as much ‘press down’ on them. But I’m finding them pretty comfy to use albeit a different typing experience. The 15″ monitor initially is great, and the speed is looking great so far. But as I use it more I’ll report on it.

In case you are wondering, whilst the price tag is pretty hefty at £1600 my decision making was based on the following factors:

  • For another £130 if you buy at John Lewis/Peter Jones you get three years accident/manufacturers warranty. So this negates worrying about something happening and not being able to replace it.
  • I’m now planning to sell all my other kit bar a secondary monitor. This will become my main workstation. This includes an old iMac, old MBP, a desktop PC and very possibly my old iPad (I will eventually upgrade to the iPhone 6+ which means I probably won’t need the iPad). I suspect that selling these will bring in some pounds to offset this £1600 cost.
  • If you buy at John Lewis, you can apply for 6 months 0% purchase interest. Or if you purchase on Apple.com they do financing as well. Both are good options for spreading payment over a couple of months allowing the new hardware to earn some money for you! :)
  • Working on my old MBP was virtually impossible, with my desktop PC being the only piece of hardware that I can work on – restricting my mobility. Increased productivity and mobility are keys to making more money.
  • The 15″ version is still lighter than my old 13″ MBP, and so the Apple guys have basically made a very portable workstation compared to some of the PC alternatives that I tried out today.
  • Whilst I thought about staying on the PC, Mac’s are still extremely stable and do the job. I have considered giving a Linux variant a go, but I will probably do this on a very old laptop that I have rather than the desktop.

All in all, an expensive purchase. Time will tell whether the processing power is worth it, but certainly my gut feeling is that this will prove a very good purchase over time, and a much better choice than the 13″ version!

 

javascript error ‘$’ is undefined

This error can often happen in Internet Explorer, and not in Chrome or Firefox. Sometimes this can be down to ensuring the jquery file is loaded before other javascripts, but I’ve discovered that actually in IE you need to ensure  type=”text/javascript” is added to each script link. Google and Firefox don’t mind not having this. Simple solution.